BatteryFinder™ widget launched

Our BatteryFinder™ widget, launched in October 2016, continues to grow as a searchable/filterable ready reference to the makes and models of battery storage currently available on the Australian market.

BatteryFinder™ emerged as a milestone in the development of the broader national Energy Storage Register – as the Register requires a comprehensive (and continually updated) list of Makes and Models of battery storage technology available for use in Australia.

1) Battery Finder is embedded below.  You can both:
(a)  Search for particular battery systems of interest; and/or
(b)  Filter down the list, by clicking the facets on the left.

2) Don’t forget that there’s no charge to embed BatteryFinder™ on your own website – simply click on the “</> Embed” button on the widget below, provide your details and follow the instructions emailed to you.

3) Based on requests from some interested parties, we are also developing API access to Battery Finder data, which will be available at a modest charge.  Please email us if you would like to know more about this.

We’ll look forward to continuing to seeing the list below increase in numbers…

Animation on WattClarity helps explain what happened during yesterday’s blackout throughout South Australia

Our CEO, Paul McArdle spent the best part of last night piecing together the animation below in an attempt to understand what went on leading up to and during yesterday’s blackout throughout South Australia. Using ez2view, the animation explains what happened in generation and demand levels in South Australia between 06:00 and 17:00 on Wednesday the 28th of September, 2016.

An initial post and an update on the situation has already been posted on WattClarity, but time permitting, more analysis of what’s happened will be published over the coming days and weeks.

Pondering the future of Australia’s electricity market through detailed analysis

Our CEO, Paul McArdle recently penned an article on WattClarity pondering whether the remarkable price results from Q2 were a short lived excursion or whether they are the begging of a more systematic change in pricing patterns. Paul’s article caught the attention of several journalists including Ben Potter from the Australian Financial Review, who referenced the analysis in his piece ‘COAG out of action as electricity prices soar‘, and sought comments from Paul on the topic:

Average wholesale electricity prices across the National Electricity Market shot up to $65-$80 a megawatt hour in the mainland NEM states in the June quarter, and to $120 in Tasmania, Paul McArdle, director of GlobalRoam, said.

Paul McArdle weighs in on discussion about the cost of Basslink cable failure

Over the weekend, Angela Macdonald-Smith and Ben Potter from the Australian Financial Review wrote an article discussing the potential cost of the recent Basslink cable failure that has been plaguing Tasmania over recent months. In March, our CEO, Paul McArdle published some of his thoughts on the topic in a post to WattClarity, and he followed it up with a short update last week responding to claims about the total cost of the cable failure. Seeking in-depth insights and analysis on the matter, the journalists referenced Paul’s comments on the matter:

The highest previous estimate of the economic impact of the outage was a $400 million back-of-the-envelope estimate from Brisbane-based energy consultant and GlobalRoam director Paul McArdle, based on similar methodology of applying the increase in average prices to typical usage.

Image of NEM-Watch used to illustrate 7:30 Report story on Basslink outage of 2016

One of our team members was surprised, last night (i.e. Friday 3rd June 2016) to see an old image of an old version of NEM-Watch (from way back in 2007) used to illustrate how Tasmania would normally be interconnected to the mainland by the sub-sea HVDC (high-voltage direct current) link connecting into the Latrobe Valley in Victoria.

Here’s the image that surprised us:

NEM-Watch used to illustrate what normally would be the interconnected nature of Tasmania to the mainland regions of the National Electricity Market

For those interested in the Tasmanian crisis, the ABC story here is worth a watch.

Coincidentally it was also yesterday that I’d published these updated thoughts on WattClarity ® about the magnitude of the cost incurred, in aggregate, by various stakeholders in the Tasmanian region of the NEM as a result of the Basslink outage, now about 6 months old.

 

Providing analysis on the possible closure of Australian power station

Last week, Sydney Morning Herald journalist’s Adam Morton and Brian Morris published an article on the possible closure of coal-power generation at the Hazelwood Power Station. In the article, the journalists sought comments from a number of industry experts including our CEO, Paul McArdle. Providing experience and insight on the topic, Paul was quoted in the article:

Most analysts who spoke to Fairfax Media said it was difficult to say what impact removing Hazelwood would have on prices – Global-Roam’s Paul McArdle said it was the “million dollar question” – but many said they were likely to increase.

Paul McArdle, managing director at Global-Roam, said: “The reality is nobody knows because it depends what competitors do.” He said it was likely prices would rise while also lifting AGL’s profitability, for example.

WattClarity helps the Australian Financial Review explain Tasmanian situation

A recent article published by our CEO, Paul McArdle about the state of Tasmania’s electricity supply was quoted by journalist Ben Potter in yesterday’s edition of the Australian Financial Review. Ben Potter sought quotes from a number of experts in the industry to clarify what cost the current Tasmanian energy crisis may result in:

“Whatever the number, it’s big” said Paul McArdle, managing director of energy consultancy Global-Roam, in a blog post last month. Mr McArdle estimated the crisis would add about $216 milliion to Tasmania’s energy costs over the March quarter.

The estimate is based on average prices of about $!50MWh – about $100 above pre-crisis prices – and average consumption of 1000MW over the quarter.

Journalist asks for insight about “free energy”

The electricity supply industry is currently the subject of much conjecture about how the future might unfold.

One such scenario involves the possibility that the cost of solar and storage will continue past patterns of decline to the point where the cost of each becomes negligible.  Software industry veteran Mike Cannon Brooks commented on this recently, so our CEO Paul McArdle was contacted for insights (due to our positioning at the intersection of energy and Information Technology) about the plausibility of this scenario – leading to the article “Completely Free Energy a hard swallow for captains of industry” in the Financial Review on 18th March 2016:

Copy of article from the AFR on 18th March

 

Further thoughts will be posted at a later date at WattClarity®, our industry commentary site.

Energy blogger uses NEM-Review to analyse historical demand data

Energy, science and technology blogger Ketan Joshi published an article on Monday which posed the question ‘Is Sydney’s heat decoupling from demand spikes?’. Within the post, he uses historical data from NEM-Review to compare New South Wales’ average demand between 2000-2015 against the daily average demand so far in 2016:

“Curiously, demand isn’t much higher or lower than the past five years. Keep in mind this comparison is slightly different – averages from 2000 to 2015, rather than temperature averages from 1859 to 2015 (like-for-like also shows average 2016 temps above the 2010-2015 average, though).”

“Regardless, there’s a novel disconnect, here. Sydney’s  unusually high temps aren’t driving unusually high demand.”

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LiveGen Widget goes live – “a world leader”

Our new internationally-focused LiveGenTM widget has been live for a short period of time, and can be accessed here:

http://data.RenewEconomy.com/LiveGen

We’re pleased to be able to work with the people at RenewEconomy to help make global complexity more understandable – in this case, in terms of the contributions of various generation fuel types across a growing number of locations (currently 29 locations across Australasia, Europe and North America with more coming…) .

We’ve built this to address one of the common points of feedback we received over the past 12 months or so of providing our NEM-WatchTM widget (accessed here and here and discussed here) to a growing number of people.

We noted that Ketan Joshi had described the new tool and “AMAZING” and had voiced some nice words about us being “a world leader in visualising” (complexity):

2016-02-02-kind-words-from-ketan

Thanks Ketan!  Always nice to hear when what we do helps to clarify something about the energy sector.

We’re looking for more locations to add in – let us know if you know of some!