Providing analysis on the possible closure of Australian power station

Last week, Sydney Morning Herald journalist’s Adam Morton and Brian Morris published an article on the possible closure of coal-power generation at the Hazelwood Power Station. In the article, the journalists sought comments from a number of industry experts including our CEO, Paul McArdle. Providing experience and insight on the topic, Paul was quoted in the article:

Most analysts who spoke to Fairfax Media said it was difficult to say what impact removing Hazelwood would have on prices – Global-Roam’s Paul McArdle said it was the “million dollar question” – but many said they were likely to increase.

Paul McArdle, managing director at Global-Roam, said: “The reality is nobody knows because it depends what competitors do.” He said it was likely prices would rise while also lifting AGL’s profitability, for example.

Energy generator uses WattClarity and ez2view to highlight demand side response in consultation paper for rule change request

The Snowy Hydro Corporation have submitted a rule change request that would see a change to the National Electricity Rules to oblige price sensitive demand greater than 30MW to bid into central dispatch.

An excerpt from this WattClarity article posted in January 2014 was used in the ‘Statement of issue’ section of the consultation paper, including a screenshot taken from ez2view.

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Explaining solar power’s contribution to power supply to a wider audience

Our CEO, Paul McArdle has been quoted by Angela Macdonald-Smith from The Australian Financial Review in regards to solar power’s place within the NEM. Paul’s comments provided an insight to a wide audience about solar’s “small but rapidly growing contribution” to power supply.

He was quoted as saying:

“About 3 gigawatts of solar power is installed across the national electricity market. In the absence of solar demand would have been higher this week byt now much is difficult to say. Only those household that had oversized their solar systems thanks to earlier, more generous feed-in tariffs would probably be able to meet their own air conditioning demand during the summer peak. Others who installed systems would still be relying on the grid to supplement their own solar generation.

Providing insights into massive demand’s impact on prices

Nigel Wilson from The Australian sought insights to explain ‘overheating’ electricity prices during the later part of summer in 2008. Nigel begins his article by stating:

“RECORD electricity demand in sweltering Victoria and South Australia yesterday pushed short-term prices close to the capped maximums, making a rise in wholesale and contract prices likely.”

And compiled insights from our CEO, Paul McArdle:

“Paul McArdle of electricity market monitor, Global-Roam, said the massive demand had had a big impact on prices.” going on to state “Global-Roam’s indicators show that by mid-afternoon there were substantial flows of electricity into Victoria from NSW, Tasmania and from Snowy Hydro.”

Providing insights to explain why Queensland energy prices soared close to record levels

After energy prices in Queensland soared close to near record level, even though there was enough spare generating capacity to meet the demand spike, there was much confusion and outrage among major energy users.

Seeking insights to help explain the situation, our CEO, Paul McArdle was quoted by journalist Duncan Hughes from the Australian Financial Review:

“The managing director of market monitor NEM-Watch, Paul McArdle, said major Queensland companies with retail electricity contracts but some spot-price exposure such as Smorgon Steel, OneSteel, zinc smelters and magnesium producers, managed the risk by winding back operations during the peaks.”

Paul went on to explain how recent events in the industry were affecting prices:

“Demand across the National Electricity Market was very modest and there was oodles of capactiy, more than 38,000 MW, available. But with the demise of state-owned Enertrade there are only four significant generators in the state and they have no problems keeping the price above $9000. They are doing their shareholders a good service.”

“Attempts to top up supply from generators in NSW were constrained because the interconnector between the states could only export 200MW, which would have been insignificant for managing prices.