LiveGen Widget goes live – “a world leader”

Our new internationally-focused LiveGenTM widget has been live for a short period of time, and can be accessed here:

http://data.RenewEconomy.com/LiveGen

We’re pleased to be able to work with the people at RenewEconomy to help make global complexity more understandable – in this case, in terms of the contributions of various generation fuel types across a growing number of locations (currently 29 locations across Australasia, Europe and North America with more coming…) .

We’ve built this to address one of the common points of feedback we received over the past 12 months or so of providing our NEM-WatchTM widget (accessed here and here and discussed here) to a growing number of people.

We noted that Ketan Joshi had described the new tool and “AMAZING” and had voiced some nice words about us being “a world leader in visualising” (complexity):

2016-02-02-kind-words-from-ketan

Thanks Ketan!  Always nice to hear when what we do helps to clarify something about the energy sector.

We’re looking for more locations to add in – let us know if you know of some!

 

 

What role might Demand Response play in a (possible) future grid featuring high levels of intermittency?

Last week Paul McArdle posted this article to WattClarity after speaking at All-Energy in early October. His presentation (with narration included) from the conference is available here:

Explaining solar power’s contribution to power supply to a wider audience

Our CEO, Paul McArdle has been quoted by Angela Macdonald-Smith from The Australian Financial Review in regards to solar power’s place within the NEM. Paul’s comments provided an insight to a wide audience about solar’s “small but rapidly growing contribution” to power supply.

He was quoted as saying:

“About 3 gigawatts of solar power is installed across the national electricity market. In the absence of solar demand would have been higher this week byt now much is difficult to say. Only those household that had oversized their solar systems thanks to earlier, more generous feed-in tariffs would probably be able to meet their own air conditioning demand during the summer peak. Others who installed systems would still be relying on the grid to supplement their own solar generation.